Thanks Matthew, great article. I noticed on the email I received about it that you state “Pro Tip: If you can string a sentence of English together, the quickest and easiest way to get started is as a freelance writer. I pay thousands of dollars per month to freelance writers and it’s a skill that most people have.” but I don’t ever see such expenses on your income reports so why is that?
But don't make the mistake of thinking this will be a passive source of income—you're on call whenever you have a guest and you'll always need to keep the place clean for incoming visitors. On top of just renting on Airbnb, consider offering your guests paid add-ons, like Lauren Gheysens', Royal Day Out in London, England—where she gives visitors a local's only tour of the city, complete with bespoke 18th century costumes.
Hi Dara, that’s a great question. I started with 2 affiliates sites at the same time, this one and another in the leadership niche each promoting different training courses I thought were worthwhile. I worked solidly for a year before I reached the $1,000 per month mark and then a couple of hours a day (admittedly with a few gaps) and reached $6,000 after 3 years.
While some might think that starting a blog is an arduous effort, when you understand the precise steps you need to take, it becomes far easier. It all starts in the decision of choosing a profitable niche and picking the right domain name. From there, you need to build your offers. You can easily sell things like mini-email courses, trainings and ebooks.
If you are more confident in your skills, you can also market directly to websites and blogs. You can contact the sites by email to market your services. That will also enable you to select the specific types of sites that you are more comfortable working with. Since there are literally thousands of websites and blogs on the web, the potential market is limitless.
Caitlin Pyle has been earning a full-time income proofreading transcripts for court reporters since 2012. Today she teaches other aspiring proofreaders how to do the same. The full cost of her course is $897 — but it can be broken down into payment “chunks” of $197 (modules 1 – 2), $400 (modules 3 – 5), and $300 (modules 6 – 9). To figure out if proofreading is the right career path for you — sign up for Caitlin's FREE seven-day intro course.
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